A Diamond Of The First Water

By Adriana Adarve – Owner & Director of Adarve Translations

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The whiter, perfectly colorless or transparent—the rarest of colors—diamonds are, the most beautiful, rare and valuable they are! And the present-day translation of “a diamond of the first water” becomes, in Spanish, un diamante de primera magnitud. Primera magnitud means “great excellence.”

While reading a new historical novel the other day I came upon an expression that I’d never heard before. The heroine of the story says, “I was never a diamond of the first water, I’m afraid. I hope you are not disappointed.” (The Secret of Pembrooke Park, by Julie Klassen, Pg. 151.)

Well, now, that’s quite an interesting expression, isn’t it? At least that is what I thought since I could not quite understand what the expression meant. Nor could I understand what the author wanted to express with it.

It intrigued me so much, that I decided to look it up and find its meaning. I also wanted to know whether the same expression exists in French and/or Spanish. So, I did some my research. As it turns out, a somewhat similar expression exists in French. A closer one, using water also, existed in Spanish as well, though it is no longer used, not even figuratively.

What does “A Diamond of The First Water” mean?

This English idiom appears to have been used for the first time around the 1600s. I referred to a grading system used by Arab diamond traders. They categorized gems as first water, second water, and third water. Diamonds of the first water were perfect, flawless. [Facts on file, Encyclopedia Of Word and Phrase Origins]. A diamond or pearl of the first water had perfect limpidity and color (luster). They were also pure and transparent. In other words, the more the diamond was like water, the higher its quality, the greater the perfection of its complexion. From there, the figurative phrase, “a man or a genius of the first water,” was born.

That grading system is no longer in use in Europe. Nonetheless, since the early 1800s it is still used in English in a figurative sense; as a synonym for unsurpassed perfection. As such, it represents a degree of quality or conformity to type. It can have positive connotations: “an artist of the first or purest water,” “that was a play of the first water.” It can also have negative or undesirable ones: “He is a bore of the first water.”

There is a similar expression in French—un diamant de la plus belle eau. That is, a diamond of perfect purity, of excellent quality. In the French gemstone trade, a diamond’s eau (water) refers to its transparency. In this case, the French language does not qualify the water as being “first water,” but as being “excellent water”.

A Most Valuable Gem

The whiter, perfectly colorless or transparent—the rarest of colors—diamonds are, the most beautiful, rare and valuable they are!

In Spain, diamond traders used the expression to refer specifically to the color of the diamond, rather than to the stone itself. This could be considered as a roundabout way to describe the quality of a gemstone, though it is not really so. It is simply a different way of expressing things in another language. Gemstone traders give the name blanco de primer agua (white of the first water) to colorless, pure and perfectly transparent diamonds. The whiter, perfectly colorless or transparent—the rarest of colors—diamonds are, the most beautiful, rare and valuable they are! And the present-day translation of “a diamond of the first water” becomes, in Spanish, un diamante de primera magnitud. Primera magnitud means “great excellence.”

The research into the origin of this expression has been very interesting. Yet, I cannot stop wondering how to best translate it without it losing its idiomatic sense. How can I translate it without being too literal either?

Literal translations are a trap into which way too many people fall all too often. I have seen, for example, “a diamond of the first water” translated in Spanish as un diamante de primer agua. I have seen it translated in French as un diamant de première eau. This does not make any sense in Spanish, and the French literal translation is obsolete. It makes little sense in the present time. It is evident that people who have posted such translations on the net, have not done the necessary research. or use them in clients’ documents, have not done the research necessary into the origin and the true meaning of the expression.

Producing Translations of The First Water

And that is what it takes to produce translations of the first water. It takes research of the unknown expression in the source language. Then it takes research of the origin and true original meaning of the expression. After that, it takes imagination to try to combine the translations of different components in the target language. Then, more research is needed about the history of such components in the target language. Finally, it is important to find their correlation to the expression in the source language.

Translation is never a matter of transferring words from one language into another. It is not a matter of making words switch places. Doing this only leads to bizarre and ill-fitting translations that end up having no meaning at all. Translation is not about transposing words. It is about interpreting words, concepts and core meanings from one language to the next.

That is what we do at Adarve translations. We look for words, we look for their meaning and we look for the origins of words and expressions. We work hard at finding the correct terminology to interpret the meaning in the documents our clients entrust us with. This is how we consistently produce translations of the first water.

So, what do you say? Would you rather have a literal, nonsensical translation in your hands? Or would you rather trust Adarve Translations to produce a translation of the first water for you?

All the best,

Adriana Adarve, Asheville, NC

I hope you share this love affair with family and friends!—Kindly re-tweet, re-post, pass it on 🙂

 

Adriana Adarve is the owner of Adarve Translations and is fluent in three languages (English, Spanish & French), as well as pluri-cultural, multi-cultural, plurilingual and multilingual.
Adriana Adarve

About the Author: Adriana Adarve is the owner and director of Adarve Translations and is fluent in three languages (English, Spanish & French). She also has basic and intermediate knowledge of three other languages, German, Italian and Portuguese, as well as being pluri-cultural, multi-cultural, plurilingual and multilingual.

5 Comments

  1. I was reading my daily devotional book by Charles Spurgeon, and apart of that devotional read: ” So precious is repentance that we may call it a diamond of the first water, and this is sweetly promised to the people of God as one most sanctifying result of salvation”. This was so intriguing to me I was compelled to search for the meaning. Your translation drove me much deeper into the translation and embedded was a more profound spiritual meaning. I have now found a new way of exploring what I read.

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